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Building Products December 2017

BUILDING PRODUCTS | SWISH | ADVERTORIAL STYLE AND FUNCTION AT THE ROOFLINE WITH SWISH Design professionals in the construction sector deal with a complex and often conflicting array of challenges in a cost-conscious industry. As well as a raft of standards and regulations, style and function often seem to be competing demands in the search for a solution. So how can manufacturers help designers strike a more even balance? Building Products magazine looks for answers. 50 BUILDING PRODUCTS | DECEMBER 2017 of products that perfectly tick the respective boxes of commodity, firmness and delight. For example, timber used to be the material of choice for roofline work – fascias, soffits, barge boards and the like. But in such a challenging environment, a softwood fascia board is unlikely to survive more than a couple of decades, especially if it doesn’t receive regular maintenance including re-painting at least once every three years or so. Cellular PVC – the material of today. As a result, cellular PVC is now the most efficient material for use at the roofline. It costs roughly the same as timber to install, requires no maintenance and so suits the exposed and inaccessible location at the eaves. Most importantly, especially from any landlord’s point An adage drilled into many first-year design students says: “Good architecture should satisfy in commodity, firmness and delight.” It’s a popular saying penned by seventeenth century translator, Henry Wooton, but attributed to Vitruvius Pollio, a Roman Architect of the 1st Century BCE. As sayings go it’s a good one, but what does it actually mean and how can manufacturers help designers strike a more even balance? The accepted view is that commodity referred to fitness for function – the item, be it a building, a piece of sculpture or a manufactured product - should be suitable for its purpose. In firmness, Pollio meant it should soundly built of good quality materials. And for delight, he meant pleasing to the trained as well as the untrained eye. So, in satisfying these demanding criteria, the building or item in question must look good, perform well and be durable. It has to successfully balance style and function. Of course, there are many other factors architects and designers need to consider in modern construction. Factors such as low environmental impact, minimal waste, maximum use of recycled materials and innovative use of new technology. These challenges are very real and the supplyside of the industry has consistently raised its game in the search for new products and solutions. In the manufacture of roofline and rainwater systems, the need to accommodate style, function, environmental awareness and use of modern technology, have all contributed to the development of a highly flexible, cost efficient and durable range Swish black Tudor boarding in combination with white fascia, soffit and rainwater goods.


Building Products December 2017
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