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Building Products January 2018

PRODUCT PROFILES | NEW BUILD Securing a £1bn opportunity 20 BUILDING PRODUCTS | JANUARY 2018 Helping to realise their vision The Microsoft Innovation Centre in Mons, Belgium, is said to be a further example of how Hunter Douglas Architectural Projects work with architects and designers to help ‘realise their vision’. The three-dimensional installation was based on a large abstract drawing that composed coloured rectangular, square and conceptual shapes. To create a physical transparency between the floors, walls and ceilings, the architects Reservoir A chose a range of Luxalon stretch metal panels from Hunter Douglas to blend the ceiling into the overall project design. Hunter Douglas’s range of stretch metal ceiling panels are said to be extremely versatile and ideal for environments where a ‘seamless vision’ is required. They are available in 600mm x 600mm tiles and up to a 600mm x 2400mm plank format, in a wide range of RAL and metallic colours. The stretch metal can be specified in a number of patterns with differing aesthetic qualities and varying openness factors. Where high levels of acoustic absorption are required, acoustic pads can be added to the back of the panels to control noise levels within corridors, rooms and open plan meeting areas. www.hunterdouglas.co.uk Ceiling system stuns in Scotland A suspension grid for plasterboard ceilings, from Armstrong Ceiling Solutions, which is said to be up to 40% quicker to install than traditional systems, has been used as the foundation for a completely bespoke day care centre ceiling. Armstrong’s drywall grid system was used to form a curved ceiling at Scottish War Blinded’s new Hawkhead Centre for visually impaired veterans in Paisley, Scotland. Other Armstrong systems have been used in a different new building on the same site. The Hawkhead Centre designed by Page\Park Architects features 1,500m2 of Armstrong’s DGS facetted system in the atrium/foyer, formed to a radius and using acoustic insulation above a black acoustic fabric and finished with birch-faced plywood planks 165mm and 225mm wide. Page\Park Architect’s Martin Flett said: “The ceilings are crucial to the visual impact of the building and the integration of building services and acoustics. “The Armstrong system forms the frame for the decorative ceiling linings and building services integration. It dovetailed well with the aesthetic and performance requirements and is clever in how it allows you to form a curve from a facetted framing system.” www.armstrongceilings.co.uk Turning over a new slate in Wisbech Carpenter, Steve Jackson, chose Westminster slate, the latest tile from Redland, the UK manufacturer and supplier of pitched roof systems, when he built his own four-bedroomed house on a plot at Christchurch in Wisbech, Cambridgeshire. A large format interlocking clay tile, the Westminster slate has a hidden cut-back interlock and a tapered leading edge that is said to make it appear exceptionally slim. It’s raised nail holes and custom-engineered head enables it to be installed on roofs with pitches as low as 17.5º. Available in three classic colours – city black, cardinal red and old college red – the tiles can be laid on a variety of roof configurations. Hips and ridges are available in both half-round and universal angle, and in permutations to allow either a colour-matched roof or the contrast typically favoured on slate roofs. Valleys are detailed using Redland’s dry valley or 125 GRP valley; while ventilation is afforded by the 8.8k ThruVent tile. Overall dimensions of the slate are 480mm x 326mm, with a cover width of 280mm and headlap range between 110mm and 140mm. www.redland.co.uk/westminster Offsite construction specialist, McAvoy Group, has been appointed to the LHC Modular Buildings Framework, which has a combined value of more than £1 billion. McAvoy has secured the opportunity to provide permanent and bespoke modular buildings and interim facilities for education, healthcare and emergency services schemes across England, Wales and Scotland for the next four years. McAvoy was successful in 15 lots and achieved the highest scores for education buildings, factory processes, and for BIM, out of all companies bidding for places on the framework. McAvoy also finished top in the workstream WS1 for permanent or interim education and healthcare buildings, which means public sector clients can award contracts directly to the company. Eugene Lynch, managing director of the McAvoy Group said: “An important factor in our appointment was our ability to develop virtual models of our clients’ buildings to facilitate more informed decision making, and enhance stakeholder engagement. This innovative use of advanced technology helps clients to reduce risk, save time and really optimise the speed and efficiency benefits of offsite construction.” www.mcavoygroup.com


Building Products January 2018
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