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Building Products January 2018

SUSTAINABILITY FOCUS JANUARY 2018 | BUILDING PRODUCTS 63 example, a paint that actively repels stains and offers increased durability will make areas easy to clean and therefore should be considered for high traffic areas that require rigorous cleaning. Paints that contain a mould-resistant fungicide, which actively inhibits the growth of mould, will be ideal for areas with high humidity levels such as bathrooms – reducing further maintenance outlay and improving the health and wellbeing of building occupants. Certain paints can also contribute to the energy efficiency of a building. Paints that contain light reflective technology will reflect twice as much light around a space than an equivalent standard emulsion – therefore making the space seem lighter, brighter and larger. This type of technology also reduces financial costs, helping to save up to 22% of lighting energy by allowing lower wattage lamps to be used. Finally, for a truly robust specification, it is also necessary to consider whole life costing (WLC). An understanding of a building’s costs over its full life span is important in managing both the capital costs of construction and the related on-going costs of operation. Therefore, by using durable paint in high traffic areas, specifiers can reduce the WLC and further extend maintenance cycles. Recycling schemes Within the UK, 55 million litres of paint and more than 100 million paint cans are wasted each year. As such, specifiers have a responsibility to ensure that empty paint cans are recycled at the end of the project – making it a contractual obligation by adding a simple clause along the following lines to tender documentation or specifications Recycle all empty paint cans at one of the many decorators’ merchant outlets operating a can recycling service. Leading manufacturers, waste contractors and even some decorators’ merchants should be able to facilitate this. Further recycling options such as paint donation schemes are also available; a good example is the Community RePaint scheme. These schemes collect left over paint and re-distribute to local individuals, families, communities and charities in need. This can help an organisation achieve corporate social responsibilities by integrating and contributing to the wider community. However, to reduce paint waste in the first place, specifiers should ensure that the paint selected is fit for purpose. By working with an experienced technical specification team, it provides the added assurance that the correct preparation is made to substrates and all factors are considered to make sure the project goes right the first time. Painting contractors should always be the last trade on site. Even on major projects, this is not always the case, which can lead to costly callbacks to retouch or repaint surfaces marked or damaged by other trades that have subsequently come to site. There are a wide variety of considerations to undertake when specifying paint for a project – be that the environmental compliance, formulations, product types or recycling solutions. All options should be taken into account to ensure the most appropriate option for individual projects are chosen. However, all leading manufactures will be able to provide expert advice and can help specifiers make an informed decision. www.duluxtradepaintexpert.co.uk/products/sust ainability Specifiers have a responsibility to ensure that paint cans are recycled


Building Products January 2018
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