Page 8

Building Products January 2018

BUILDING PRODUCTS | NEWS NEWS Composite door sector to see ‘significant growth to 2021’ 8 BUILDING PRODUCTS | JANUARY 2018 Inquiry into falls from height New department name ‘puts focus on housing’ A new report from Palmer Market Research suggests the composite door sector will see significant growth through to 2021. According to The Market for Domestic Entrance Doors, composite doors now account for 54% of the domestic entrance door market, the share rising to 56% by installed value with the inclusion of PVC/ABS faced doors. This follows an above market forecast 9% increase in volume last year to 758,000 doors. Taken in its entirety, the market for entrance doors, however, remained relatively flat last year at 1.4million door sets, with growth of just 0.9%. This compares to the 2.2% seen last year. Despite the growth of composites, PVC-U panels remained the second biggest material, accounting for 25% of the market in volume terms and 24% in installed value. This included modest growth in volume last year of 0.7% to 351,000 door sets. Timber accounted for 16% in volume and 15% in installed value. This included a 25% decline in volume to 228,000 doors – the continuation of a 20-year downward trend. Steel faced door sets fell 12% in 2016 to 40,000 doors – supplied almost exclusively into new build. Aluminium, again supplied primarily into new build, recorded growth. Report author, Robert Palmer (pictured right) said: “Going forward, there are a number of factors, which we expect to mute total market growth in coming years. Despite significant demand for new homes, a general slowing of the housing market is having a corresponding impact on new build completions. Consumer confidence has also weakened – something that is very difficult to disconnect from the continuing uncertainty that has accompanied Brexit.” The government has reinforced its pledge to tackle the housing crisis, with the renaming of the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG), which will now be known as the Department for Housing, Communities and Local Government. Sajid Javid will remain as secretary of state for the newly named department, following Theresa May’s Cabinet reshuffle. Sajid Javid said: “Building the homes our country needs is an absolute priority for this government and so I’m delighted the Prime Minister has asked me to serve in this role. The name change for the department reflects this government’s renewed focus to deliver more homes and build strong communities across England.” Commenting on the name change, Brian Berry (pictured above, left), chief executive of the Federation of Master Builders (FMB) said: “The inclusion of the word ‘housing’ sends a clear signal as to the importance the government places on housing policy, by the renaming of the department and the secretary of state’s title. However, actions always speak louder than words, which is why it is vital that we also see continuity, application and a continued willingness to be bold where necessary in housing policy. “We want to see continuity in terms of building on a set of good policies to unleash the capacity of the SME house building sector, set out in the Housing White Paper; application in terms of effective implementation; and a willingness to still be bold where government intervention is still called for.” The Prime Minister’s reshuffle also saw Dominic Raab appointed as housing minister (the fourth in three years), replacing Alok Sharma, who has been appointed as employment minister. Brian Berry added: “Once again we have a new housing minister, which doesn’t really help build the continuity and greater certainty that the sector needs. “However, Dominic Raab is an able and influential Conservative MP, who we hope will bring a new energy and focus to the brief.” Richard Beresford (pictured above right), chief executive of the National Federation of Builders, took a similar view to Berry, stating: “Having four housing ministers in three years makes it increasingly difficult for the industry to establish an effective working relationship with the government. Addressing the housing crisis doesn’t just require resolve, but also consistency of approach.” The newly formed All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for Working at Height, chaired by Glasgow Central MP, Alison Thewliss, and supported by the Prefabricated Access Suppliers’ & Manufacturers’ Association (PASMA), has launched its first inquiry into the numbers of serious injuries and fatalities which occur as a result of a fall from height. The APPG will consider evidence and develop a report and recommendations on how the frequency of serious injuries and fatalities can be reduced. The inquiry will be open for evidence submissions from interested stakeholders until February 6, 2018. It is reported that in 2016/2017, 18% of those who died at work were killed as a result of a fall from height. PASMA, and the Access Industry Forum, believes that there are a number of issues that should be addressed urgently to reduce these figures. Alison Thewliss said: “That 18% of people killed at work did so as a result of a fall from height is a shocking statistic. The APPG for Working at Height has brought together concerned MPs from several parties to investigate the reasons for falls from height and ensure current regulations are sufficient for protecting workers at height in the UK.”


Building Products January 2018
To see the actual publication please follow the link above