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Building Products July 2017

FLOORS AND FLOOR COVERINGS NO STICKING POINTS There are plenty of reasons to choose adhesive-free flooring, especially in time sensitive sectors such as healthcare, education or social housing where having key areas out of action is not an option. Adhesive-free flooring should be one of your ‘go-to’ products in areas where downtime is just not an option, says David Brailsford. Benefits offered by adhesive-free flooring extend far beyond time and cost saving, as it can also be an ideal solution for refurbishment or new build projects with a less than perfect subfloor. There are of course many factors to consider when it comes to choosing flooring – hygiene, safety, cleanability, aesthetics, durability, value for money all come into the mix. But for situations where downtime is an issue, adhesive-free flooring can be ideal and offers benefits that can make a contractor’s or end user’s lot that bit easier. Looking first at the time saving benefit, it is possible to cut installation time by half by using adhesive-free flooring rather than traditional methods. Some of the best adhesive-free flooring lies flat and performs like traditional adhered flooring. Edges and joints are secured in place with double-sided, moisture tolerant tape while being installed, coved and welded. With no adhesive, 56 BUILDING PRODUCTS | JULY 2017 there is no need to wait for it to ‘cure’. That means you can lay, weld and walk on it, all on the same day. No adhesive also means no tacky areas or trafficking glue through a building, and none of the associated odours either. Less time and less disruption often means cost saving too. Aside from any savings, there are time critical areas where adhesive-free flooring may be the only viable option; luckily that does not mean compromising on quality. The most obvious example is the busy hospital corridor in constant use – adhesive-free flooring options make it possible to keep these vital areas fit for purpose. Adhesive-free is ideal for other less obvious areas too – social housing for example. Vacant properties drain the lifeblood from social housing finances. The longer properties are untenanted, the more strain they place on revenues, and the more vulnerable buildings become to deterioration or damage.


Building Products July 2017
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