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Building Products March 2018

INSULATION AND ACOUSTICS MARCH 2018 | BUILDING PRODUCTS 35 can assess a minimum SRI value for the cavity barrier with knowledge of either the existing overall path value or details of the individual path obstructing elements. Occasionally, conditions arise that demand substantially higher SRI values of the cavity barrier, such as ceiling voids formed by open-cell or substantially perforated suspended ceilings. Twin barrier or multiple element arrangements can then be employed to accommodate almost all possible sound performance criteria. In this situation, Rw values are for the barrier arrangement alone. Room-to-room performance (DnCw) would normally be significantly higher. Weakest link When you combine the evolving nature of the workplace with modern lightweight construction, such as curtain walls, this can also present a number of challenges when it comes to acoustics. The overall sound performance in a curtain wall building is effectively controlled by the ‘weakest link’. This means that very careful consideration should be given to any potential weak point to ensure it does not become the ‘limiting factor’ in the overall sound transmission performance. The curtain wall, together with the movement joint, should all be considered as potential weak points and thoroughly assessed. Sound better The marketplace offers a large range of tried and tested product enhancements specifically developed for both building interiors and the facade industry. From flexible and semi-rigid acoustic barriers for suspended ceilings, to acoustic void closures for tops of walls and fire stops for profiled decks, these acoustic solutions are designed to effectively reduce sound transmission via hidden voids. If you are looking to reduce vertical and horizontal sound transmission in curtain wall buildings, there are a number of effective and proven acoustic void barriers and barrier overlays for facades that deal with all common sound path problems. They are frequently used to assist in reducing flanking transmission between adjacent internal areas. Acoustic comfort in the built environment has become a concern to society and a challenge to designers. It is all too common when considering the specification of the seal between the slab edge and the facade, for product selection to be based exclusively in terms of compliance to the relevant fire regulations. For facade engineers, architects and their clients, it is essential that due consideration is given to both the acoustic implications and performance of the closure arrangement, ensuring any potential weak point in curtain walled buildings is controlled. The cavity seal should ideally always be selected at the design stage because at this point, the largest range of suitable products is potentially available to the designer. Products can therefore be selected based on cost-effectiveness, ease of installation, and acoustic performance. Post or remedial treatment severely limits available product selection. Also, it is invariably more expensive and less practical to install and may not always be fully compliant. While a superior acoustic environment should be a given, successful acoustic design is a detailoriented process which requires good planning and the careful consideration of both specification and construction. The use of performance enhancing products will increase the internal amenity of a building, without impacting on design or cost. www.siderise.com


Building Products March 2018
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