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Building Products October 2017

DOORS, WINDOWS AND ACCESSORIES During the day, noise from vehicles and trains is not particularly bothersome. After all, these sounds are part and parcel of living in modern cities and towns. Living near a busy road or train station can be advantageous for many people, simply due to ease of travel. However, these types of noises become inconvenient during the night and evening, when the desired sound levels for comfort drops. Although unassuming, noise from cars and trains can contribute to disturbing and disrupting sleep, which may take a toll on your physical and mental health. Many people have taken to sound reducing windows, to eliminate virtually all noise created from these sources during the night, helping them sleep soundly whilst continuing to reap the benefits of living in areas with great travel links. Noise from next door is at an all-time high for many of us! This is especially true in cities and towns as we live in increasingly close quarters. When anti-social noise is mentioned, we often picture children have a good time, over-exuberant musicians or yappy dogs – but poor soundproofing in your home can mean even low-level sounds seep through. Sound reducing windows will contribute 54 BUILDING PRODUCTS | OCTOBER 2017 to reducing irksome sounds from neighbours and busy residential roads. The process of soundproofing for many of us begins with a frantic search on Google, which may or may not find a solution for the problem. Although all modern windows achieve some level of protection against noise, there are listed glazing options that could be considered when looking to maximise sound reflection and absorption in a dwelling. It is, perhaps, surprising that many people have not heard of triple glazing, or its benefits. Triple glazing is the less popular alternative to double glazing and involves adding an extra pane of glass to the windows. Although there are many benefits with triple glazing, such as improved heat insulation, if noise is the problem it may not be the best option. Adding an extra pane of glass does have some noise limiting qualities, however, the type of glass used is typically of the same density and thickness - which does little for sound reduction. That makes triple glazing a solution best suitable for low-level, anti-social noise. Double glazing's soundproofing power comes <<< Continued from page 53 from the space between the two panes of glass and the thickness of each sheet. These factors combined help to effectively dissipate and disperse sounds of certain frequencies making it great for eliminating road and rail noise. For extra sound reducing qualities, ask about laminated panes. Secondary glazing is most definitely an option that should be considered. Of the three options, secondary glazing is the most effective method for sound reduction, which could explain why it has been growing in popularity amongst home owners. Typically, units are installed internally within your existing window frame, which not only makes secondary glazing suitable for properties with traditional or listed features but also causes the gap between the two panes of glass to be far wider than double glazed windows. Secondary glazed windows are designed to keep 90% of unwanted external noise out of your home, making it an effective solution for homes affected by aircraft noise pollution. Sound reduction can be applied to many types of windows, including pvc-u and wooden framed windows, and rarely requires planning permission. Chris Brooks is Director of Bennbrook Windows


Building Products October 2017
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